Thursday, 26 July 2018

Barnabas Tew and the Case of the Missing Scarab by Columbkill Noonan



Barnabas Tew, a detective in Victorian London, is having a hard time making a name for himself, probably because most of his clients end up dead before he can solve their cases. His luck is about to change, though, for better or worse: Anubis, the Egyptian god of the dead, notices him and calls him to the Egyptian underworld. A terrible kidnapping has occurred; one that promises to put an end to the status quo and could perhaps even put an end to the entire world. It is up to Barnabas (along with his trusty assistant, Wilfred) to discover the culprit and set things to right. Can he turn his luck around and solve the most important case of his life?


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Guest Post:

A bit about Barnabas Tew
Barnabas Tew is a detective (or, at least, he really wants to be a detective). He gets some business, but he’s not always terribly successful at solving his cases. He likes to think of himself as a detective in the mold of Sherlock Holmes, but it seems that he only deduces the identity of the culprit once they’ve already done whatever it is he was meant to stop them from doing.

He feels terribly guilty about all this, of course; but he persists nevertheless, because he is very sure that he is brilliant (and at the same time very much afraid that he is not).

Still, his life is predictable, if not terribly exciting (and, truth be told, he’s not much for excitement, anyway). He likes predictable. He rises early in the morning (as only ne’er-do-wells stayed in bed past seven, in Barnabas’ opinion). He has a nice breakfast of some bland, boiled something-or-other, served by his landlady. Then he spends a few minutes reading the paper before welcoming his assistant, Wilfred, and then together they open their office doors for a proper day of work. Of course, there is precious little traffic through those doors, because Barnabas, whilst an earnest and hardworking man, is, as we said, also not terribly good at detective work; indeed, his clients were just as likely to suffer an untimely death as to have their cases solved, despite Barnabas’ best efforts to prevent such tragic and terribly upsetting occurrences.)

Barnabas, like any good Victorian detective, likes things just-so. Breakfasts ought to be had on time, gardens ought to be properly kept and carefully tended (by a gardener, of course, since once mustn’t get one’s hands dirty), people should be neatly and properly dressed in clothing appropriate to their station in life. Everyone must always do their duty, at the proper time and in the proper way. But, to Barnabas, the most important rule of all is that one must always be polite, no matter the circumstances.

Then, suddenly, one day, everything changes. Barnabas, together with Wilfred, is unexpectedly (and most unpredictably) whisked off to the Egyptian underworld to solve a case for Anubis, the God of the Dead. Here, things are not orderly, not even in the slightest; gardens are decidedly unkempt, nothing is predictable, and people do not dress according to British laws of fashion. Indeed, not everyone even has a proper head, as Barnabas discovers almost immediately when he comes face-to-face with Anti, the ferryman to the Land of the Dead (who has, distressingly, the head and wings of a falcon).

Barnabas, of course, is very confused by his new surroundings (and, to be honest, more than a little distressed, as well). Still, he has been given a duty to do, which means that he will perform it to the best of his ability, bizarre circumstances or no. And, despite the strange things that happen to him, or the odd (and sometimes unsavory) characters that he meets, he still strives to maintain a degree of decorum about him, because one must never be impolite, no matter whom, or what, one is dealing with.

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Author Bio:

Columbkill Noonan lives in Baltimore, Maryland, USA, where she teaches yoga and Anatomy and Physiology.

Her work has appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines. Her first novel, “Barnabas Tew and the Case of the Missing Scarab” by Crooked Cat Books, was released in 2017, and her latest work, “Barnabas Tew and the Case of the Nine Worlds”, is set to be released in September 2018.

In her spare time, Columbkill enjoys hiking, paddle boarding, aerial yoga, and riding her rescue horse, Mittens.

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