Saturday, 18 November 2017

The Jigsaw and the Fan by Stewart Bint

My Review:

Trade unionist, Albert, is dead but his journey to heaven or hell is disrupted by a strike.
Sent to a grand house to wait out the strike, Albert causes trouble for the Lord of the Manor.

A witty and satirical read with a disruptive ghost, quarrelling angels and mysterious beings pulling the strings.

The characters are fully developed and brought to life (...well, death) by Stewart's pen.

It's a well-written, humorous book that's a delight to read.





Synopsis:


The Jigsaw And The Fan is described as social satire. How much trouble can one disgruntled ghost really cause?

Albert Carter has died, and finds himself in the spirit world, to get sorted out at St Christopher’s gates. Having been a successful shop steward picketing the management of Jebson’s Glue Factory on behalf of his colleagues, he feels confident his final destination is Heaven, with the rest of the decent, honest working class.

However, on arrival at St Christopher’s Doomsday Ministry, an inspectors’ strike means all spirits in transit have to be temporarily repatriated to Earth as ghosts, until the dispute is settled.

Albert’s ghostly assignment is his worst nightmare: a wealthy Lord’s manor which operates on the hard-earned wages of his own class.

Immediately on arrival, he decides to ruin the capitalist family, and begins his unlawful haunting as the Ghost of Marlston Manor. Watching him from the heavens is a host of guardian angels, elders, overlords and scribes – all scrambling to undo the havoc that Albert is blunderingly creating in his short stint as a ghost.

The final straw comes as Albert riles up a “fright” of ghosts to collude and protest their sentences on Earth – and Albert finally faces St Christopher.



The Author:

Stewart Bint is an international novelist, journalist/magazine columnist, and PR writer, who usually goes barefoot.

His current publisher is Canadian company, Dragon Moon Press, based in the city of Red Deer, Alberta.

Stewart Bint is married to Sue, and has two grown-up children, Christopher and Charlotte. He lives in Leicestershire in the UK. When writing, his office companion is his charismatic budgie, or his neighbour's cat - but not at the same time.

He is a member of the influential international authors group, The Awethors.

A former broadcaster, he has worked as a radio newsreader, current affairs presenter and phone-in show host.

His inspiration to become a writer came at the tender age of seven, through the television series, Doctor Who. He says: "I remember watching the very first episode way back in 1963, and became enraptured by the storylines which could take place at any time in Earth's history and future, and absolutely anywhere in the universe and beyond. I started creating my own worlds and my own characters, writing my stories in little blue notebooks until my parents bought me my first typewriter for my ninth birthday. And those make-believe worlds became invaluable when my Dad died when I was 11. I retreated more and more into those places where I was in control of my characters' fate - knowing that whatever happened to them during the story, I could make sure they were okay in the end. My worlds were certainly better than the real one at that time."

When not writing he is an active awareness-raising campaigner for mental health and sepsis, having gained a place on the 2016 list of "Inspirational Mental Health Advocates that are changing the world."

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